MotorStorm RC: Review

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Evolution Studios, the creators of MotorStorm and, well, aside from that and WRC, not much else.  But that’s OK, because they are good at it, there isn’t much need to go into other things right now, right?

MotorStorm RC, although still a racing game, is a large departure from anything they have done previously.  While their other racing games have always been from traditional camera angles; Hood, in-car, rear, etc.  This game is seen entirely from a isometric angle.  Harking in games of old like Super Off-Road, and closer to the fantastic Rock and Roll Racing for the SNES.

So, with the change in play style, camera, and the shrinking of the MotorStorm franchise into a 5-inch screen (or, whatever size your TV is if you are playing on the PS3.) Does Evolution Studios pull it off?

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Silent Hill: A Look Back on the Madness

If you think that finding yourself mysteriously stranded in a fog and steam filled ghost town, inexplicitly inhabited my Marilyn Manson stage props is your idea of a good time, I have the perfect game for you! The long running series places you in the most terrifying, heart racing, and utterly nightmare educing town of Silent hill, (or in some cases, around the town.) spanning from 1999 to 2012, There have been some hits and misses, but when they hit, they made sure it was going to stick with you for a very, very long time. Talk is heating up about the latest Silent Hill title in development; Silent Hill: Downpour. Articles, screenshots, and music clips are leaking.

"Leaking"…"Downpour". See what I did there? Terrible! Anyway, lets take a look back to where it all began, and explores the origins, impact and groundbreaking influence of Konami’s turn of the millennium masterpiece.

 

In Danse Macabre, an excellent discussion of horror in literature, television and film, Stephen King raises the concept of ‘The Bad Place’; a dreaded building or location inhabited by pure, unadulterated evil, where people fear to tread. The author points out that this archetype is found far and wide within folklore and works of entertainment and has provided the foundation for a great many stories of terror and unease. Literature and cinema have given us Dracula’s Castle, Hill House, and King’s own Overlook Hotel. By the turn of the millennium, video games also had their own established line of ‘Bad Places’, predominately, taking the form of sinister, shadowy abodes such as Mr Barrows’ Clock Tower, and the Umbrella Mansion. None of these, however, have become as synonymous with outright terror or as enduring in legacy and infamy, as the town of Silent Hill.

 

In 1996, when Resident Evil was making waves and it became apparent that Western audiences had acquired a new-found taste for atmospheric, Japanese-developed horror games, the new owners of Tokyo based company Konami, decided to launch their own substantial American hit, and swiftly assembled a development team for this purpose.

Headed by project director and designer Keiichiro Toyama, this group of unconventional individuals, dubbed Team Silent, took an unusually leftfield and creative approach, spending a great deal of time experimenting with various concepts and ideas. Knowing that their aim was to capture a chilling experience that would play well in the West, they poured over the works of popular American writers, searching for inspiration in terms of setting and story.  Konami’s visionary team conceived a small, New England settlement that had become a deeply twisted and horrifying place, corrupted by a prevailing supernatural force, alternating between two separate dimensions, one of which was only marginally less nightmarish than the other.

This creation was a vision of suburban familiarity plunged into a deep and illogical hell. Streets shrouded in thick fog hid prowling, winged beasts, a cryptic message in a blood-soaked dog kennel directing you to ‘go to school’. To follow this instruction invited a whole new realm of chaos; the school’s environment visibly transformed into a rotting, mocking husk as it shifted to the dark Otherworld, which brought creeping, deformed Halflings lurching out of the shadows.

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Temple Run (IOS) Review

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I will be reviewing another app which I tried on my iPhone. For reading this AWESOME review of AWESOME AWESOMENESS, your dream woman will be tending to your nightly desires…YES I said it… she will play chess with you 😀

Unlike the previous games I have reviewed this one is surprisingly free. This game is very addicting so if your thinking of downloading it then BEWARE…

The requirements for this app are:
-Compatible with all iDevices
-Must have IOS 3.0 or later

 

 

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Sreet Fighter IV Mobile reviewed (Android/iOS)

In this review, ReverEND and I (Sufyan) will be taking a closer look at Street Fighter 4 for both mobile platforms, iOS and Android and compare some differences in the and the similarities.  So sit back and read…..DO IT!

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Call Of Duty: Black Ops Zombies Review (iOS)

Now we all knew that Call Of Duty Black Ops was going to come out for the iPhone, it was only a matter of time.

Just like the console game, The iPhone version has the “kino” map which from the German I used to learn in school I think means Cinema or theater but its been a while since I have used German.  There is also the tutorial for the basics but if you’ve played Call Of Duty: World @ War already then the controls should be second nature. The last map that was included in the game when it was released was “Dead Ops Arcade”. Once again just like the console game, “Dead Ops Arcade” is played with the analogs that are on the screen. you can adjust the options to your comfort.

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Assassin’s Creed: Revelations Review

 

My name is Desmond Miles, I am a bartender who just served beers to people, then I got pulled off and became awesome, can you believe that! I can access my ancestors DNA and see what they have done before, once I do that I can learn from them to do awesome parkour stuff, that and stab people in the back. My favorite ancestor is Ezio Auditore De-Firenze, yes he is old now but he still runs like the 20 year old version of himself. Ok hold on a sec this plot is filled with so many holes that I can’t wrap my head around it anymore, seriously we all know that you can’t pass your own unique DNA to your children, some strands do but not memories. I mean he can access his ancestor “Al-Taier Ibn La-Ahad” (which literally translate to The Flyer Son Of No One in Arabic) and becomes awesome from the Animus? Geez I get that this is a game but that is so weird and crazy. So after all that rant and crazy talk I would like to start dissecting one of my favorite series in the current generation of games.

 

 

 

 

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