N4L: DLConspiracy

nxe_marketplace_011-1024x576With the rise of high-speed interconnection in today’s consoles. We’ve been given a theoretical unlimited amount of play to our favorite games. Not only can we get new cars in racers, but whole new adventures in other games. New weapons. Even overall enhancement in the form of better visuals, audio, and better controls. Along those lines. We’re also given a quick and easy way of renting or buying movies to watch instantly from our homes. And even now, we are getting the chance to buy full games from the comfort of our couches. We can then send friends a message and invite them to watch the movie we just bought or rented and chat with them while watching it. All from our cozy homes. Truly. This generation of gaming has made the biggest leap technologically speaking. Other systems may have tried these forms of Internet connectability (Genesis X-Band, Dreamcast. PS2). But they never reached the always on, always connected feel and ease of use that the newest systems have today. The ability to download demos, themes, music, movies, updates for games, enhancements, add-ons. Etc etc. The list goes on. All this is at a price though… How much are you willing to spend? How much as you willing to give up?

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Crysis for 360 Quick Review

 

The original Crysis was less of a game and more of a demented stress test for your computer. If you were able to run it at very high settings, you must have had some futuristic light-speed hive-mind computer from Mars. At the time, people wondered if Crysis could be played on current generation consoles at all, because it seemed they were all far too weak to even run the game on low settings. In fact, there was so much hype over how taxing the game was, few actually paid attention to its gameplay, which is a shame because Crysis was actually pretty fun. As a result, Crysis went silently into the annals of video game history as a cult classic hit. Then, of course, Crysis 2 came out on consoles and did fairly well for itself. So it’s only natural that the first Crysis would see a re-release, though we didn’t expect it to show up on current-gen consoles. Somehow Crytek has managed to squeeze all of the original game onto the Xbox and PS3. Still, the question remains: does Crysis hold up when put on consoles?

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