no carbon copy.

Lets talk console exclusives, remember back in the day playing your ps2, or your original xbox, and having games that the other consoles didn’t? always arguing which had the better games? what happened to that? for instance, xbox now has playstation exclusives such as silent hill, resident evil, and now metal gear solid and counting. … Read moreno carbon copy.

Top 5 movies that SHOULD have a game.

So, I get this link in my email with a ringtone from Hangover from my girlfriend where one of the characters is singing about there lost friend and if he’s been murdered by meth addicts that they would be “shit out of luck” and I instantly thought how cool this movie would be as a game.  and I laughed to myself and started wondering what other movies would make awesome games.  Not just the obvious “cool movie=cool game” theory…that never works, well..up until this year it seems.  But, I decided to make a list of some of the more tilted, obscure, underground good movies that should get a cool game to go with it.

Another note, these are movies that will I believe are best suited for a game.  Sure, there are other movies that would probably make very interesting games, but may have to be shoehorned, I think these are easy-ish fits into a game genre without much lose to the integrity of the story. Also, I’m trying to stay away from movies that are already like a game.. I thought of other movies, but also was able to quickly think of a game that was much like the film.   So, here we go!…
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Read moreTop 5 movies that SHOULD have a game.

N4L: DLConspiracy

nxe_marketplace_011-1024x576With the rise of high-speed interconnection in today’s consoles. We’ve been given a theoretical unlimited amount of play to our favorite games. Not only can we get new cars in racers, but whole new adventures in other games. New weapons. Even overall enhancement in the form of better visuals, audio, and better controls. Along those lines. We’re also given a quick and easy way of renting or buying movies to watch instantly from our homes. And even now, we are getting the chance to buy full games from the comfort of our couches. We can then send friends a message and invite them to watch the movie we just bought or rented and chat with them while watching it. All from our cozy homes. Truly. This generation of gaming has made the biggest leap technologically speaking. Other systems may have tried these forms of Internet connectability (Genesis X-Band, Dreamcast. PS2). But they never reached the always on, always connected feel and ease of use that the newest systems have today. The ability to download demos, themes, music, movies, updates for games, enhancements, add-ons. Etc etc. The list goes on. All this is at a price though… How much are you willing to spend? How much as you willing to give up?

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The TRON Story

 

We start our story how all good stories should start; with deception, greed, lies and the underlining sense that the person on the other end of a phone call has no clue what they are in for. Before I started college, I worked as Technical Support for the Xbox3601. Maybe you’ve heard of it? I was the guy you would call if you had issues with online connectivity, billing, hardware malfunction, etc. I would fix it as best I could over the phone. There was something else that I got on the phones sometimes, “Phishers”2. A Phisher, as defined by FreeDictionary.com, is someone who requests confidential information over the Internet under false pretenses in order to fraudulently obtain credit card numbers, passwords, or other personal data. These people who call in trying to get me to slip up and tell them the smallest amount of information they could use to later call back and get access to the account with. This is a story of one of those incidences my friends and I have labeled “The TRON story”.

In case some people don’t know, TRON3 is a cult classic from 1982 featuring some of the first instances of computer-generated imagery, also known as “CGI”4. The movie, about a computer programmer/hacker accidently gets himself stuck in a computer world called “The Grid” and he’s forced to play gladiator like games in order to continue living, was critically panned and a box office failure, but like other stinky cheeses, aged well and picked up a strong cult following that allowed it a sequel called Tron: Legacy set for release in late 2010, which is where this story officially begins.

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Silent Hill: A Look Back on the Madness

If you think that finding yourself mysteriously stranded in a fog and steam filled ghost town, inexplicitly inhabited my Marilyn Manson stage props is your idea of a good time, I have the perfect game for you! The long running series places you in the most terrifying, heart racing, and utterly nightmare educing town of Silent hill, (or in some cases, around the town.) spanning from 1999 to 2012, There have been some hits and misses, but when they hit, they made sure it was going to stick with you for a very, very long time. Talk is heating up about the latest Silent Hill title in development; Silent Hill: Downpour. Articles, screenshots, and music clips are leaking.

"Leaking"…"Downpour". See what I did there? Terrible! Anyway, lets take a look back to where it all began, and explores the origins, impact and groundbreaking influence of Konami’s turn of the millennium masterpiece.

 

In Danse Macabre, an excellent discussion of horror in literature, television and film, Stephen King raises the concept of ‘The Bad Place’; a dreaded building or location inhabited by pure, unadulterated evil, where people fear to tread. The author points out that this archetype is found far and wide within folklore and works of entertainment and has provided the foundation for a great many stories of terror and unease. Literature and cinema have given us Dracula’s Castle, Hill House, and King’s own Overlook Hotel. By the turn of the millennium, video games also had their own established line of ‘Bad Places’, predominately, taking the form of sinister, shadowy abodes such as Mr Barrows’ Clock Tower, and the Umbrella Mansion. None of these, however, have become as synonymous with outright terror or as enduring in legacy and infamy, as the town of Silent Hill.

 

In 1996, when Resident Evil was making waves and it became apparent that Western audiences had acquired a new-found taste for atmospheric, Japanese-developed horror games, the new owners of Tokyo based company Konami, decided to launch their own substantial American hit, and swiftly assembled a development team for this purpose.

Headed by project director and designer Keiichiro Toyama, this group of unconventional individuals, dubbed Team Silent, took an unusually leftfield and creative approach, spending a great deal of time experimenting with various concepts and ideas. Knowing that their aim was to capture a chilling experience that would play well in the West, they poured over the works of popular American writers, searching for inspiration in terms of setting and story.  Konami’s visionary team conceived a small, New England settlement that had become a deeply twisted and horrifying place, corrupted by a prevailing supernatural force, alternating between two separate dimensions, one of which was only marginally less nightmarish than the other.

This creation was a vision of suburban familiarity plunged into a deep and illogical hell. Streets shrouded in thick fog hid prowling, winged beasts, a cryptic message in a blood-soaked dog kennel directing you to ‘go to school’. To follow this instruction invited a whole new realm of chaos; the school’s environment visibly transformed into a rotting, mocking husk as it shifted to the dark Otherworld, which brought creeping, deformed Halflings lurching out of the shadows.

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